Welcome To Visit Jionglish.com

There, I said it, in perfect Chinglish. Or Jionglish, rather. In China, they’re obsessed about making people feel at home, so in perfect Chinglish, it’s not “Welcome to Tianjin”, but “Welcome to Visit Tianjin” or “Welcome to Take Express Train”. It’s a grammar thing.

It’s also a Chinglish thing. Chinglish is nothing less than a confused mix of both English and Chinese, but this doesn’t cut it well. To qualify as Chinglish, or Jionglish, rather, you need to mix up the English so bad that it starts not making sense. By the way, we’re also calling this Jionglish as it contains the Chinese expression Jiong (囧), which basically is an expression of shock, confusion, and “I’ve-lost-it”-ness. It also looks like an “upset facial expression” character — the kind you’d pull if you ran into a sign that went “DO NOT BE OCCUPYING WHILE STABILIZING” on trains.

Far from making fun of either languages or their hybrid and grammatically challenged hybrid, this blog hopes to help locals get things right. Unlike other Chinglish blogs, where all they do is post signs with clueless Chinglish and laugh at them, I’m also in the business of correcting mixed-up signs.

It’s a personal thing. For one thing, I feel much happier when train announcements in China go through without a bit of Chinglish…

Here goes…

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2 Responses to Welcome To Visit Jionglish.com

  1. Jodie says:

    “Unlike other Chinglish blogs, where all they do is post signs with clueless Chinglish and laugh at them, I’m also in the business of correcting mixed-up signs.”

    I must admit, I do laugh at Chinglish but at the same time, I’ll respect anyone who makes an attempt to speak or write in another language. That’s more than a lot of people can claim. My attempts at Spanish were often met with howls of laughter but they were also met with a willingness to help, so I never minded.

    Some Chinglish I’ve seen sounds far better than a strict translation though. The best one I can think of is a sign that was trying to say “keep off the grass”, but it said something along the lines of:

    “Young, tender grass. How hard-hearted to trample it.” I think the meaning comes across fine and it’s a lot more eloquent than “keep off the grass”. Of course, with important signs and documents, a professional translation company really needs to be brought in but where it isn’t doing any harm, Chinglish really does have its own kind of charm.

  2. DavidFeng says:

    I will have to polish up my Dutch first…

    When people speak to me in that lingo, I get about 60% – 70%. Throw a paper at me in Dutch, and I can make sense of at least half of what’s written.

    But when it comes to writing and speaking in Dutch… I have a big tendency to fantastically #FAIL with my own amalgamated English-Dutch-German-glish… or whatever that thing is…

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